Courage Mastery: Course Introduction

Every journey begins with a single step. ― Lao Tzu

The story of the tea master and the samurai helps illustrate the definition of courage as described in the Bushido, the code of the samurai that has been passed down for centuries in Japan. These warriors no longer exist, however their core tenets are still highly valued in even today.

As outlined in Inazo Nitobe’s book Bushido: The Soul of Japan, courage is one of the eight core tenets and consists of two parts: the ability to decide what is morally right, and the action taken to support that decision.

The tea master in the earlier story knew what the correct decision was, and resolved himself to approach it, even though he feared the outcome. He thought he didn’t have the courage to carry through the action needed, but discovered he already had it within himself.

You too can call upon your inner courage to fight for what you know is right. Have you ever been in a situation where you didn’t stand up for yourself?

Maybe you had the opportunity to share your thoughts during a meeting but didn’t speak up. Perhaps you didn’t tell someone how you really felt and missed a chance to fulfill a dream. Or maybe you’d like to start your own business, but fear of failure is holding you back.

When reflecting back on these situations, it is normal to feel regret as you didn’t take action to achieve what you really wanted.

However, you have the strength within to take risks and confront challenges. Even if you don’t immediately recognize it within yourself, you have the courage to stand up for yourself with confidence and realize your full potential.

The True Nature of Courage

In today’s world, courage is often misunderstood as a lack of fear. But this is not the case: courage is about doing what is right, irrespective of fear or even using fear as motivation. There is no courage without fear. The two complement each other as yin and yang.

Courage is often mistaken with being reckless. Courage is taking a calculated risk that you are prepared for, like seizing an opportunity when it arises to improve your life.

Regular display of courage builds self-confidence over time, and helps you achieve results which might seem impossible or difficult to achieve. Courage is also like a muscle: something that can be trained over time and utilized when needed the most.

The story of the tea master and the samurai helps illustrate the definition of courage as described in the Bushido, the code of the samurai that has been passed down for centuries in Japan. These warriors no longer exist, however their core tenets are still highly valued in even today.

As outlined in Inazo Nitobe’s book Bushido: The Soul of Japan, courage is one of the eight core tenets and consists of two parts: the ability to decide what is morally right, and the action taken to support that decision.

The tea master in the earlier story knew what the correct decision was, and resolved himself to approach it, even though he feared the outcome. He thought he didn’t have the courage to carry through the action needed, but discovered he already had it within himself.

You too can call upon your inner courage to fight for what you know is right.

Have you ever been in a situation where you didn’t stand up for yourself?

Maybe you had the opportunity to share your thoughts during a meeting but didn’t speak up. Perhaps you didn’t tell someone how you really felt and missed a chance to fulfill a dream. Or maybe you’d like to start your own business, but fear of failure is holding you back.

When reflecting back on these situations, it is normal to feel regret as you didn’t take action to achieve what you really wanted.

However, you have the strength within to take risks and confront challenges. Even if you don’t immediately recognize it within yourself, you have the courage to stand up for yourself with confidence and realize your full potential.

In today’s world, courage is often misunderstood as a lack of fear. But this is not the case: courage is about doing what is right, irrespective of fear or even using fear as motivation. There is no courage without fear. The two complement each other as yin and yang.

Courage is often mistaken with being reckless. Courage is taking a calculated risk that you are prepared for, like seizing an opportunity when it arises to improve your life. 

Regular display of courage builds self-confidence over time, and helps you achieve results which might seem impossible or difficult to achieve. Courage is also like a muscle: something that can be trained over time and utilized when needed the most.

Summary

Courage can be realized in just a moment, but it’s the careful cultivation of that courage within ourselves that allows us to implement it when needed.

The following rituals, based on principles sourced from the samurai code and other timeless wisdom, are designed to help you connect with your inner courage.

In practicing them regularly, you will be training yourself to be able wield courage when you truly need to.

Good learning and enjoy the journey.

Start Improving Your Courage Now.

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